Here's the explaination for everything;  http://www.tedbrewer.com/yachtdesign.html
 
Built 1984, shoal draft 
LOA 37' 
LWL 30' 
Beam 11' 10 in 
Draft 4' 10"
Draft of hull only, approx. 2' 
Displacement 22,000 lbs (not the 18,000 advertised) 
Ballast 7700 lbs 
Sail Area  710 sq ft  
Mast Height from water  51'  
Water Capacity  100 gal  
Fuel Capacity  44 gal  
Aux. Power  38 hp
I  46'6 in  
J  17'  
P  39' 8 in  
E  13'
Disp. Length Ratio T  
Keel Material  Lead 
  
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Hull Speed  7.34  
The following is the formula used to calculate The Theoretical Maximum Hull Speed:
Maximum Hull Speed = 1.34 * LWL1/2
LWL:  Boat Length at Water Line
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CAPSIZE SCREENING FORMULA (CSF): Some years ago the technical committe of the Cruising Club of America came up with a simple formula to determine if a boat had blue water capability. The CSF compares beam with displacement since excess beam contributes to capsize and heavy displacement reduces capsize vulnerability. The formula is the maximum beam divided by the cube root of the displacement in cubic feet; B/Displ.333. The displacement in cubic feet can be found by dividing the displacement in pounds by 64, of course.
The boat is acceptable if the result of the calculation is 2.0 or less but, of course, the lower the better. For example, a 12 meter yacht of 60,000 lbs displacement and 12 foot beam will have a CSF Number of 1.23, so would be considered very safe from capsize. A contemporary light displacement yacht, such as a Beneteau 311 (7716 lbs, 10'7" beam) has a CSF number of 2.14. Based on the formula, while a fine coastal cruiser, such a yacht may not be the best choice for ocean passages.


Capsize Ratio for Hunter 37 cutter is  1.91
The Stability of the boat is: 1.71 (Stability is predicted !!)
The following is the formula used to calculate The Capsize Screening Formula:
Capsize Screening Formula = Beam / (Displacement / 64)1/3
Displacement is in Pounds
Beam is Measured in Feet
The screening stability value of the boat is: 29.36; Angle of Vanishing Stability is 130.66
The following is the formula used to calculate The Angle of Vanishing Stability:
Screening Stability Value ( SSV )  =  ( Beam 2 ) / ( BR * HD * DV 1/3 )
BR:  Ballast Ratio ( Keel Weight / Total Weight )
HD:  Hull Draft in meters
DV:  The Displacement Volume in cubic meters.  DV is entered as pounds of displacement on the webpage and converted to cubic meters by the formula:  
Displacement Volume in Cubic Meters = 
( Weight in Pounds / 64 ) * 0.0283168
The Beam and Hull Draft in this formula are in meters.  These values are entered in feet on the webpage and are converted to meters before SSV  calculation.
Angle of Vanishing Stability approximately equals  110 + ( 400 / (SSV-10) )


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The Sail Area Displacement Ratio is: 14.47. The sailboat is a cruiser-racer
The following is the formula used to calculate The SA/D Ratio:    
SA / D  = Sail Area / ( DV ) 2/3
SA:  Sail Area in Square Feet
D:  Displacement in Cubic Feet
DV:  The Displacement Volume in cubic feet.  DV is entered as cubic feet of displacement, tons or pounds of displacement on the webpage.  If entered as pounds of displacement, this value is converted to cubic feet by the formula: 
Displacement Volume in Cubic Feet = Weight in Pounds / 64 
Displacement Volume in Cubic Feet = ( Long Tons of Displacement * 2240 ) / 64


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The Displacement to Length Ratio is: 363.76. The sailboat is a heavy displacement cruiser.
DISPLACEMENT/LENGTH RATIO: The D/L ratio is a non-dimensional figure derived from the displacement in tons (of 2240 lbs) divided by .01 LWL cubed, or, Dt/(.01 LWL)3. It allows us to compare the displacement of boats of widely different LWLs. Some examples of various D/L ratios follow, but are generalities only as there is often a wide range within each type.
BOAT TYPE D/L RATIO
Light racing multihull 40-50 
Ultra light ocean racer 60-100
Very light ocean racer 100-150
Light cruiser/racer 150-200
Light cruising auxiliary 200-250
Average cruising auxiliary 250-300
Heavy cruising auxiliary 300-350
Very heavy cruising auxiliary 350-400
 
The following is the formula used to calculate The D/L Ratio:
D / L = Displacement / ( 0.01 * LWL )3
LWL:  Boat Length at Water Line
D:  Displacement in Log Tons
Displacement can be entered as long tons or pounds of displacement on the webpage.  If entered as pounds of displacement, this value is converted to long tons by the formula: 
Long Tons  = Pounds / 2240


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The Motion Comfort Ratio is: 38.41
The CR is : Displacement in pounds/ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x B1.333). Ratios will vary from 5.0 for a light daysailer to the high 60s for a super heavy vessel, such as a Colin Archer ketch. Moderate and successful ocean cruisers, such as the Valiant 40 and Whitby 42, will fall into the low-middle 30s range
Motion Comfort  Ratio was developed by Boat Designer Ted Brewer.   The formula predicts the speed of the upward and downward motion of the boat as it encounters waves and swells.   The faster the motion the more uncomfortable the passengers.  Thus, the formula predicts the overall comfort of a boat when it is underway.  Higher values denote a more comfortable ride.  As the Displacement increases the motion comfort ratio will increase.  As the length and beam increases the motion comfort ratio will decrease.
The following is the formula used to calculate The Motion Comfort Ratio:
MCR  = Disp / (2/3*((7/10 * LWL)+(1/3 *LOA))*Beam4/3)
Disp:  Displacement in pounds
LWL:  Boat Length at Water Line in feet.
LOA:  Over All Length of the Boat in feet.
Beam:  The Widest Part of the Boat in feet.
Displacement can be entered as long tons or pounds of displacement on the web page.  If entered as pounds of displacement, this value is converted to long tons by the formula: 
Long Tons  = Pounds / 2240